ISRF Fellows & Projects

The foundation has made a number of awards, ranging from small group projects to 1-year fellowships and multi-year projects. Click Here for more information about our competitive funding streams.

THOSE WISHING TO CONTACT ISRF FELLOWS REGARDING THEIR ISRF-FUNDED WORK – INCLUDING MEDIA ENQUIRIES – SHOULD IN THE FIRST INSTANCE CONTACT DR LARS CORNELISSEN

Early Career Fellows

Awarded to full- or part-time academics within 10 years of PhD – More Info

2017/18 Cohort

2015/16 Cohort

2013/14 Cohort

2011/12 Cohort

Mid-Career Fellows

Awarded to full- or part-time academics at least 10 years post-PhD – More Info

2018/19 Cohort

2016/17 Cohort

2014/15 Cohort

2012/13 Cohort

Political Economy Fellows

Awarded to full- or part-time academics – More Info

2018/19 Cohort

2017/18 Cohort

Independent Scholar Fellows

Awarded to scholars working outside of academia – More Info

2017/18

2015/16

2014/15

2013/14

Small Group Projects

Awarded to groups of 2-10 scholars providing flexible support for the activities of the research group – More Info

Residential Research Groups

Awarded to groups of 2-10 scholars providing support for short, intensive residential research projects.

Josephine Lethbridge

Interdisciplinary Editor at The Conversation
APRIL 2017 –

From April 2017, Josephine Lethbridge will be The Conversation’s Interdisciplinary Editor, funded by the ISRF. Josephine’s role will include working with scholars at The Conversation’s member universities, as well as past and present Fellows of the ISRF, to bring interdisciplinary social research to millions of readers worldwide. Josephine will encourage researchers to write short newsworthy articles, working with them to produce pieces with journalistic flair but no loss of academic rigour. The ISRF hope that, by promoting interdisciplinarity through this partnership with The Conversation, the usefulness of interdisciplinary approaches will reach broader audiences, and that knowledge of such work will spread beyond the confines of academia.

Any ISRF Fellows wishing to pitch an idea for an article to Josephine, or simply interested in knowing more, should contact her directly at josephine.lethbridge@theconversation.com.

‘ECONOMICS &…’ WORKSHOP SERIES

Goldsmiths, University of London
MAY 2017 –

A series of three annual workshops with the aim of bringing economists and other social scientists, to facilitate new conversations and the development of common vocabularies.

the development of common vocabularies.

Economics & The Plastic Arts | Goldsmiths, University of London | 4- 5 July 2019
Organiser: Dr Constantinos Repapis

The impulse for this workshop is to explore what is the evolving nature of art, and how this can relate and inform the way we understand economics. More Info

Economics & Anthropology | Goldsmiths, University of London | 12-13 January 2018
Organisers: Dr Ivano Cardinale and Dr Constantinos Repapis

This workshop aimed to explore key interfaces between economics and anthropology. It included four sessions, on the themes of production and work, industrialization and development, credit and debt, and economic action. More Info

Economics: Past, Present and Future. An Interview Project

Goldsmiths, University of London
JULY 2016 –

A pilot project – led by Dr Ivano Cardinale & Dr Constantinos Repapis, with technical support from Dr Ricardo Leizaola – aimed to investigate how one might re-orient economics, featuring interviews with celebrated economists who have articulated a clear view of what is wrong with the subject and how we can change it. The basic outcome of this project was to provide non-technical and easy access material to students and the wider public that are interested in discourses of the economy which we find to have merit but are marginalised in the current public discussion.

A second series of interview, led by Dr Ragupathy Venkatachalam, will be produced from January 2019.

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Finishing Time: A Pilot Project Following ‘Offenders’ Beyond Their Resettlement Into The Community After Punishment

Plymouth University
AUGUST 2018 – JULY 2020

This project – led by Dr Julie Parsons – incorporates ideas from the Photographic electronic Narrative (PeN) project hosted at an ‘offender’ resettlement scheme (RS), as well as initiatives explored during an August 2017 research residential, Mapping the Transformative Potential of Participatory Styles of Research with Vulnerable, Marginalised and/or Hard-to-Reach Groups. The success of the PeN project is such that the RS continues to use it as part of its work with ‘offenders’, documenting ‘offender’ journeys through their resettlement scheme. This is currently supported by Plymouth University, and from May 2018 – April 2020, the PeN project will be one of five impact measurement tools used by the RS in their evaluation of the scheme. Moreover, data gathered through the PeN project continues to be shared with stakeholders, delivery partners, funders, supporters and the wider community.

‘Finishing Time’ (FT) follows ‘offenders’ who have been on placement at the RS, beyond their re-entry into the community after punishment. The FT project incorporates ideas developed during an ISRF residential ‘mapping the transformative potential of participatory styles of research with marginalised groups’. Indeed, a collaborative and creative approach is fitting, as all of the participants have experience of the criminal justice system and are likely to be wary of traditional interview situations (Jewkes 2012). In preparation, participants will provide photographs or images from other sources, and/or objects of significance to them. During semi-structured interviews, participants will visually map their resettlement journeys beyond their time at the RS and significantly for some, beyond the end of their licence conditions/supervision orders. This provides participants with a story line to help with organising memories and encouraging a temporal sense of change (Williams and Keady 2012, McLeod 2017). Both the storyline and photographs/ images/ objects are a useful focus for participants as they discuss their resettlement journeys.

International Development and New Financial Frontiers

University of Warwick & University College Dublin
MARCH 2019 – FEBRUARY 2020

A significant shift in the architecture of international development finance is taking place. Under the aegis of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), plans are underway to move away from exclusive public financing of sustainable development to the active engagement of the private sector in the mobilisation and delivery of development finance. This includes a) official partnerships with financial actors not traditionally engaged in development finance, such as hedge funds, pension funds, insurance companies and private equity firms; and b) creating new markets and forms of financial instruments to fund public goods and services, including securities, bonds and insurance.

This evolving landscape poses significant challenges to the regulation and governance of the international development architecture and broader transnational economic governance. As new partnerships and modalities of engagement are formed, existing structures of governance and accountability are reconstituted, reshaping the relationships between different actors to a development finance transaction and reconfiguring the regulatory modalities through which these relationships are governed.

This project – led by Dr Celine Tan and Siobhán Airey – seeks to engage in an interdisciplinary examination of these changes in international development finance policy and practice, drawing from insights from law, politics, economics and finance and geography. The focus here is to map, assess and critique this evolving architecture and what this means for international development cooperation and global economic governance.

It aims to contribute to scholarship and policy in this area in three important ways: 1) publication of a papers that will provide novel insights in the subject area and establish international development finance as a dedicated field of interdisciplinary scholarly enquiry; 2) production of an interdisciplinary resource bank for teaching and research in this area; 3) formation of a specialist node and network of interdisciplinary scholars in the field to feed into the preparation of a larger research project to explore the issues in depth.

NETWORK MAPPING OF CONTEMPORARY ECONOMISTS IN FRANCE

UNIVERSITY OF BARCELONA & INSTITUT DES SYSTÈMES COMPLEXES, PARIS ILE-DE-FRANCE (ISC-PIF)
MARCH 2019 –

The research project contributes to the ISRF’s programme: ‘Reframing the moral foundations of economics’, which responded to the displacement of a social science discipline of economics (Political Economy) by a ‘scientised’ quantification of economic activity. The project’s overall goal is a generally applicable analysis of the relational structures and the normative controversies existing among contemporary economists, to understand how far these determine both the nature of academic economics and economic policy.

Previous ISRF-Funded Projects

Centre for Social Ontology - EPFL

Centre for Social Ontology
ÉCOLE POLYTECHNIQUE FÉDÉRALE DE LAUSANNE | JANUARY 2011 – DECEMBER 2013

The Centre for Social Ontology was based in the College of Humanities at EPFL, its central focus being the Morphogenetic Project. The project’s main theoretical aim was to conceptualize a nascent but unique transformation of the social order towards ‘Morphogenesis Unbound’.

Centre for Social Ontology - University of Warwick

CENTRE FOR SOCIAL ONTOLOGY
UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK | JANUARY 2014 – DECEMBER 2016

The Centre for Social Ontology (CSO) was established in 2011 at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), where Professor Margaret Archer was ISRF Chair in Social Theory 2011-2013. Following a move to the Department of Sociology at the University of Warwick, its main focus was the Morphogenetic Project.

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Critical Economics Summit

CRITICAL ECONOMICS SUMMIT
UNIVERSITY OF BOLOGNA | MAY 2017

This 3-day-summit, organised by Rethinking Economics Bologna, had two objectives: firstly, to analyze how the economic discipline can contribute to better address these global challenges, widening its scope and perspective; secondly, to identify the critical knowledge economists need to be equipped with.

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Digital Social Science Forum

DIGITAL SOCIAL SCIENCE FORUM
2015-16

The Digital Social Science Forum brought together innovative figures, working at the cutting edge of research in their own fields, in order to develop an interdisciplinary space within which the Digital Social Sciences could thrive.

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Hau: Journal of Ethnographic Theory

HAU: JOURNAL OF ETHNOGRAPHIC THEORY

HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory is an international peer-reviewed, open-access journal which aims to situate ethnography as the prime heuristic of anthropology, and return it to the forefront of conceptual developments in the discipline.

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Limits of the Numerical

LIMITS OF THE NUMERICAL

CRASSH, UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE
SEPTEMBER 2015 – AUGUST 2018

The Limits of the Numerical project explored one of the most pressing sets of questions for modern social science and its relation to policy. What are the effects on a system of social policy when numerical quantification and evaluation is introduced into that system? How does the use of numerical evaluation exclude, trivialize or distort other systems of political, moral and social evaluation? What are the political and moral consequences of this shift towards numerical evaluation? These questions are addressed with respect to three distinct strands of social policy — education, climate change and healthcare — three areas where social science, policy and the gritty world of politics interact with intense urgency.

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Professorial Research Fellowship - University of Cambridge

Professorial Research Fellowship
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE | OCTOBER 2011 – SEPTEMBER 2014

The research programme was intended to generate a book and papers on a range of topics as well as to support participation in workshops and networks.

Revisiting the Unconscious Defences Against Anxiety Thesis

PSYCHOANALYSIS OF ORGANISATIONS WORKSHOP
ST JOHN’S COLLEGE, OXFORD | 16-17 SEPTEMBER 2013

The workshop was jointly organised by Professor Paul Tod, Tutorial Fellow in Mathematics; Dr Louise Braddock of Girton College, Cambridge and the Independent Social Research Foundation; Dr David Armstrong, Principal Consultant at Tavistock Consulting, Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust; and Professor Michael Rustin, Professor of Sociology at the University of East London, Visiting Professor at the Tavistock Clinic, and Associate of the British Psychoanalytic Society.

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Sociology and Psychoanalysis: The Unfilled Promise

Sociology and Psychoanalysis: The Unfilled Promise

UCL Institute of Education
11-12 November 2016

A conference organised by the Institute of Psychoanalysis, and the British Sociological Association’s study group for Sociology, Psychoanalysis and the Psychosocial.

“Over the course of this conference we will explore the presence of psychoanalysis within the history of sociology, reflect on earlier attempts to bring about the much delayed rapprochement between the disciplines, investigate the continued ‘application’ of psychoanalysis within the field of sociological enquiry, and consider what the two disciplines might learn from each other today. How does psychoanalysis, attending to the unconscious fantasy life of the individual, move beyond the realm of private interests? Conversely, how does sociology reflect on the operation of the unconscious? What forms of psychoanalysis are sustainable in different socio-political climates? And how can a psychoanalytic sociology enhance our understanding of contemporary society.

Bringing together international scholars and practioners of sociology and psychoanalysis, our goal will be to explore the terms of a future psychoanalytic sociology and sociologically informed psychoanalysis.”

Keynote Speaker: Professor Jessica Benjamin, New York University

Location: Institute of Education, University College London (20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL)

Conference organisers: Peter Redman (Open University), Michael Rustin (University of East London), Julie Walsh (Warwick University)

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